Diego Garcia: Estela Discoidea (Guest post by Marcos Suárez)

Featuring : Diego García

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Let’s be honest, fetishes are great.

Whether you get your kicks from shoes, vintage stuff, or licking honey from riding crops on full moon nights, fetishes provide that edge into our common existences (if any!). Admitting and acknowledging them is merely a matter of personal choices, preferences and perspectives. And that is what I did some months ago. I came clean about my obsessive and never-to-be surrendered passion for 10” records at my local record store.

honkitonk

As a matter of fact I would buy compulsively most of them, should they cross my path, regardless of styles and conditions,with only one rule, it has to be in shops, market stalls, streets etc etc,  not in the Internet. And no ska records, sorry….Fetish.

And it actually proved to be a good move, as the kind people at Honky Tonk records put aside for me a copy of one of the best records to be published in Spain in a long time.

Diego García’s “Estela Discoidea” was pressed by a truly independent and amazing record label: Sonido Muchacho, from Madrid. I first heard about Diego when a local promoter who was considering the possibility of bringing him down to play some gigs in Galicia talked with my band about a supporting slot.

I heard the record and I liked it, but not to the extent that has pushed me to write these words for you, lovers of the space beyond, and the inner spirit of cosmic peace. It is a ultra limited press of 200 clear 10” that you might be able to snap from their website, with a fantastic sound for all you record lovers.

Diego was given a Farfisa at a young and tender age. The rest is an easy but not necessarily educated guess. And that is what I mean by responsible parenting. Too many people in the advertising business, too many publicists. Sorry whether you like it or not, but Bill Hicks was right.

Too many of you.

Which brings us to today’s post. “Estela Discoidea” dwells in all aspects of vintage analog electronic music, keeping that videogames 8bit vibe played from galaxies afar. Yes, there are influences, but remember that we live in an era where definitions, metaphors, and concepts have been corrupted by an overdose of irony. And music (and electronic music in particular) also suffers from that. Too many labels, styles, and marketing ridden strategies that try to pigeon hole our love for music. Is it a wave of irony? Or is it real?

Too many of you.

Take one pinch of Add N to (x), a hint of Umberto and a slice of Drum Eyes. Mix gently, and finally pour over a golden calix and dink it in one gulp. So you throw up. You regurgitate God’s nectar. Your puke could be as good as Diego’s record. Or it couldn’t.

Because what Diego delivers is a fantastic collection of tunes that differ  but are linked by their love for that vintage analog sound. A little bit of kraut, a little bit of electronic weirdness, lounge, middle eastern scales, techno-pop…I am no musical surgeon, so you’ll get neither autopsies nor dissections of the music itself. As mentioned before, there is a clear connection to video game riffs and 8bit sounds, not due to a palpable intention to replicate and reproduce THAT sound, but because it shares methods to produce sounds and create analogies, common grounds and links that bring us together, eventually.

And there is not a lot you can do but accept these circumstances. You share machines, then you share sounds. End of the story.

Diego Garcia – Estela Discoidea

All the record is programmed with an exquisite taste for that particular sound, with organ and drum machine beats alike. And it really makes a difference. As the drum beats vary in their origin, it definitely helps the record move forward in one direction, but in intertwined and sometimes opposite lanes.

And just when you thought it was over (now come the Gravediggaz…..) we encounter “Marcha Albiónica”. This is the best song in Spanish music since “Droning Forever” by Schwarz. A syncopated breakbeat that expands like the gills on Brautigan’s trout, drowning in Port wine. Drunk on sweetness and thick liquor. This is “connecting” music at its best. The kind you will listen to with glassy eyes, staring into crimson and distant horizons, or immersing yourself into a moonless summer night, where infinite stars challenge your sanity. It is a march, and it is Albion related. So I am left wondering about any Blake connections here. If so, the true face of  Los is in front of us.

Diego Garcia – Marcha Albionica

I am not quite sure about Diego’s plans for touring this musical gem. What I am really sure of is that “Estela Discoidea” is a landmark in SPanish music, so obsessed with noise related rock and overrated indie bands which lack quality but continue to shit records because they know “the right people in the business”.

Too many of you.

Marcos Suárez is 20Jazzfunkgreat’s kin. He teaches English for a living and plays synths, circuit bent devices and theremins in many musical projects (Haecceidad, Orquesta Pánico, Recojo Chatarra…) in his beloved Galicia.