XXJFG


14th July 2014

Experimental evidence of massive-scale epic state contagion through oneiric networks

Featuring:

Leisure Birds

tzconan

Epic states can be transferred to others via oneiric networks, leading people to experience epic states without their awareness. Oneiric contagion is well established in religious experiments, with people experiencing epic sensations and epiphanies through oneiric networks.

Data from an all-encompassing astral network, collected over a 5000 year period suggests that longer-lasting states (e.g., enlightenment, transcendence, damnation) can be acquired through networks [Jodorowsky A (1973) Alahzred (700)], although the results are controversial.

In an experiment with people who sleep, we tested whether oneiric contagion occurs in out-of-body experiences through increasing the amount of epic content in the dreamscape.

When epic expressions were augmented, people experienced further epic reactions and behaviors, including enchanted-artifact questing, summoning of familiars from the netherworld, and construction of glowing palaces made of singing diamonds. These results indicate that epic states in oneiric networks influence our own epic states, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via oneiric networks.

Methodology

The experiment manipulated the extent to which people (N =689,003) were exposed to epic expressions in their dreamscape. This tested whether exposure to epic emotions changed people’s epic states, in particular whether exposure to epic content led people to act in ways that were consistent with the exposure. When a person entered into REM state, each dream-situation had between a 10% and 90% chance of being boosted with epic motifs including glimpses of scenes described in the Sword & Sorcery literature, Skyrim, and Boris Vallejo and John Buscema, as well as psychedelic motorik drones selected by the council of Elders, chaired by George R.R. Martin, Michael Moorcock and invocations of Robert E. Howard, Fritz Leiber and Angela Carter (see exhibit).

Exhibit: Tetrahedron

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Leisure Birds – Seven Spirals

The sounds of Leisure Birds’ Tetrahedron exist in a dimension rubbing and, every so often, intersecting with ours. When it does, the sensation as if you were the sun dancing through a battle-cat’s cradle of megalithic constructions, or, in Seven Spirals, a puny unit of humanity splattered over a beach, just as the god-hand arrives with the gift of thunder.

You can acquire Tetrahedron from Moon Glyph.

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12th July 2014

Laurence, Angela likes him, Tony likes him…

Featuring:

20jfg & Podcast

demis

…and Sue would like to hear him: so please, d’you think we could have some?

20jazzfukgreats – the hour of love

Mystery podcast, as normal no track list available so play name that tune in the comments box.

Comments

We ♥ your comments...

  1. 11:27 – Odyssey – Who (cover – need some help id’ing the artist)


    Yours sincerely

    Juan23

    12th July 2014


  2. 30:53 Aphrodite’s Child – The Four Horsemen


    Yours sincerely

    Juan23

    12th July 2014


  3. 00:00 Vangelis – Sex Power 1ere partie (part 2)


    Yours sincerely

    nico77

    14th July 2014


  4. 03:12 Aphrodite’s Child – Aegian Sea


    Yours sincerely

    nico77

    14th July 2014


  5. 11:30 Demis Roussos – I dig you


    Yours sincerely

    nico77

    14th July 2014


  6. 8:30 Demis Roussos – Deepest of all


    Yours sincerely

    nico77

    14th July 2014



  7. Yours sincerely

    C. Knox

    17th July 2014


  8. I read about masculine domination in modern societies. The question I put to the theories I come across is – can they accommodate Demis Roussos? Nice mix


    Yours sincerely

    Dav

    17th July 2014


  9. 54:20 Forever and Ever :)


    Yours sincerely

    :)

    23rd July 2014


  10. Abigail’s pussy party


    Yours sincerely

    Blah blah

    10th August 2014


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9th July 2014

The Hated Squeak of Seagulls

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(art is by Michelle Lanter.)

Though this blog cut its disco teeth on the mean streets of Brighton, gosh, it actually has been a bit of a while since we actually gave you lot a heads up about any hometown sounds.

(My theory about this is that because of the way thinks work now, it actually takes a much more concerted effort to limit your output to one population, whether its a geographic, ethnic, or even subcultural population group. Sure, in 2004 we might have known who all the cool bands in Brighton were, but in 2014 we and everyone reading this blog are just as likely to know who the cool musicians from Bhutan are. Music disseminated via the virus of social media is like dark secrets looking for light.)

But Brighton – it’s been a while since national magazines were touting it as “the new Seattle”, largely off the back of Electrelane and Eighties Matchbox and British Sea Power relocating here.

The things that have happened since have been small, and few and far between. This is not a bad thing. Because the stuff seeping through now is genuine and musical and bravely unscene.

There is Collectress.

Collectress make super-special chamber pop. Consummately played, poetic, and perfectly-pitched – it’s not overly-decorative, twee or muso, which I think is sometimes what people assume when they see the phrase “chamber pop.” It’s just gorgeousness. Sometimes slightly ominous gorgeous. That cello a dark, circling undertow. Their songs are like little tone poems that map the psychogeography of Brighton – the violin even approximates the hated squeak of seagulls sometimes!

Collectress – Pumphouse

Collectress – Goodbye

Collectress’ members have played with Bat For Lashes and Mary Hampton, and bolstering the Brighton connections, their excellent debut album Mondegreen was recorded by Rob White of Demons Are Real records and Joe Watson formerly of Stereolab.

If you like them (and you will) then you will also like Timbre Hollow, the sole album by Threnody Ensemble, released in 2000.

Threnody Ensemble – The Machine

Buy Mondegreen from Peeler Records

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